Mop Sink in Data Closet....


(Jonathan LaMaster) #1

We are working on floor plans for a small counseling center office. And the ONLY spare room for a Data Closet has a Mop Sink in it. Yes, this is NOT ideal, but anyone else having to work around something like this?


(Alex Conner) #2

Three words - wall mount cabinet.


(Norman Ho) #3

As long as the data cabinet is elevated (flooding), wiring runs above, cabinet can be locked up and the room has adequate ventilation for the hot air then it should work. If you have a exhaust fan for the room it would be best as that should ensure the humidity level is kept low.

If you can dismantle the mop sink, that would be the preferred option.


(Isaac Johnson) #4

When I was in missions, pretty much all my network closets and server rooms were bathrooms and kitchens, once I even dropped a backbone between offices through the kitchen grease vents because there was just no other option, but that’s just how China is with office spaces. It definitely isn’t ideal, but keep everything elevated and make sure that if water sprayed due to a busted tap that it isn’t going to hit the hardware. Just don’t do the craziest thing I ever saw: setup a full rack in a shower.


(Will Polley) #5

I would rather share a storage closet with a wall mount cabinet. We’re moving more toward shared spaces as well. Sq ft used in ministry areas is more valuable than a two post with a switch and battery.


(Alex Conner) #6

When starting from scratch, I really like to have a small closet for tech gear. Almost every facility needs a place for telco demarcs, alarm systems, access control, background music, PBX, video recorders, etc. so collecting all of that up into an access & climate controlled space with one UPS system can really improve the lifespan, TCO & safety of that gear. Also, as you discover more needs over time you automatically have a space for it.

Unfortunately, that’s not always practical. I’ve put IDFs about everywhere, but cleaning closets are one of the worst options. They’re routinely unlocked, especially after-hours, have very poor access control (usually a key that everyone has, including guests), and a fairly risky environmental footprint (lots of liquids flying around, and thus humidity). If you have to do shared space, there are likely better options available if you think hard enough. Even an inconspicuous locked cabinet in the staff break room or reception area is an improvement.


(Jeremy Good) #7

One of our smaller campuses that was a small Baptist or Lutheran church before merging with us has a really small closet with a sink in it. Our switch, phone switch, dvr, and alarm panel were in there in a wall rack up towards the ceiling. It worked out pretty well actually. There wasn’t much heat from the gear but if we had a server in there it would have gotten pretty hot.


(Russ Taylor) #8

A simple method of cooling your closet equipment is to make two vents into the cupboard. One at floor level and one at ceiling level (just above or in the back of the cabinet if possible). This will then create a natural chimney effect (hot air rises) and keep the temperature levels within reason without the need for any expensive cooling system.


(Steve Hudson) #9

We have a wall mounted data cabinet in a janitor closet that includes a mop sink. It has been a shared space for 11 years. No issues. Just mount the cabinet as high as reasonably feasible.